February 2007 Issue

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CONTROL DESIGN is the only industrial automation magazine dedicated to the automation information needs of industrial machine builders, those original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) that build the machines that make industry work.

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Articles

  • Lean means

    We spend a lot of time spotlighting automation and control best practices among machine builders, yet there’s not a lot of conversation about what lean manufacturing means for them.

  • Build to last

    This article looks at how machine builders and their suppliers view total lifecycle costs associated with automation hardware and software, with the focus on reducing costs while still maintaining performance.

  • Less staff = More leverage for you

    A good strategy starts with knowing your worth in the marketplace. Keep your resumé up to date, periodically search for a new job, and establish your value. Only then can you get your employer to see the light.

  • Back to the books: PLC easy reader

    The coverage of IEC-61131 is complete and rivals standalone books on the subject. The author covers the languages, the application of the languages, and where the big benefits come from.

  • Boost SQL server IQ

    When Microsoft released .NET technology, writing software for embedded operating systems such as Windows CE became as easy as writing a desktop application.

  • Giddy for GigE vision

    It’s important to note that, from day one, the GigE Vision framework was designed to support a range of different performance levels and feature sets. Control Design Executive Editor Jim Montague explains why.

  • Observers or sensors for drive controls?

    This article shows why open-loop, algorithmic motor control is an accurate, less-costly alternative to sensor-based drive solutions. In combination, the two offer unique redundancy value. Read why.

  • Machine safety made (a bit) easier

    As contributing editor Loren Shaum notes, leveraging a safety-minded company culture, new standards, and safety devices built to those standards make machines safer, and safety relays play a big part.

  • We have power-supply problems

    Readers offer up advice on installing redundant, DIN-rail, 24 V, switch-mode power supplies in parallel in this installment of The Answer to Your Problems.

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