Motion Control Resource Center

Controls engineers need a variety of information on motion control elements that include drives, motors, servos and steppers, motion software, motion controllers, hydraulics, pneumatics, electromechanical, linear actuators, power supplies, valves and cylinders.

Motion control systems are some of the most rapidly evolving elements in modern machine automation. The more traditional motion control solutions that involve a mostly mechanical array of components now makes way for sophistciated combinations of electronic hardware and software that provide levels of performance unheard of a decade ago.

Electronic drives provide the means for enhanced speed, position, and torque control compared with mechanical options.

Both AC motors and DC motors are applicable for motion control, depending on factors such as available power or the specific motion function requirements.

Servo motors and stepper motors and their requisite controllers are responsible for some of the more dramatic changes in motion control capability, most often used for precise rotary positioning applications. Integrated servo motor and drive units combine simplicity and space-savings for small footprint motion control needs.

Linear motion and its control are carried out through the use of electromechanical components such as ballscrews and leadscrews, belt-driven linear slides and guides, pneumatic cylinders, and direct-drive linear motors.

Hydraulic-based power and control are used for many motion control applications with high-power requirements not easily matched by electric motors.

Timely news, back-to-basics primers, feature articles, technical white papers and descriptions of the latest products all provide valuable insights that can be used in designing and building modern motion control systems.

Articles

White Papers: In Depth Research

  • Machine Automation Consolidation in a Box

    Author: Intel

    This article discusses how Intel's pre-integrated, pre-validated embedded virtualization product allows customers to merge and manage multiple discrete systems into a single machine. Learn more.

  • Tips for Using Multi-Function Safety Relays in Automation Industries

    Author: AutomationDirect

    One or more multi-function safety relays can often be used to replace many basic single-function safety relays, simplifying installations and saving money.

  • AutomationDirect Group Motor Protection

    Author: AutomationDirect

    Rather than explaining the full NEC standard, the paper provides an easy-to-understand overview of Article 430 of the NEC motor branch circuit requirements for short circuit and ground fault protection, as well as motor overload protection. This White Pape

  • Cut Costs, Boost Machine Flexibility with Distributed Servo Systems

    Author: Control Design Staff

    In this latest installment of the Control Design Essentials series, learn how you can cut costs and build more flexible machines with distributed servo systems.