Zero-Tolerance Policy

Jan. 5, 2010

We think it makes sense to have a zero-tolerance policy toward energized work in the panels and MCCs in our new machine designs since our technicians are more involved in customer-site troubleshooting. NFPA 70E is a challenge to work through, but it appears we can do things such as restrict high voltage to one access door and employ non-contact test points through the enclosure door and have everything else at 24 V. It seems we then can lock out panels without the time and involvement of live-dead-live tests in full PPE for the technician.

We think it makes sense to have a zero-tolerance policy toward energized work in the panels and MCCs in our new machine designs since our technicians are more involved in customer-site troubleshooting. NFPA 70E is a challenge to work through, but it appears we can do things such as restrict high voltage to one access door and employ non-contact test points through the enclosure door and have everything else at 24 V. It seems we then can lock out panels without the time and involvement of live-dead-live tests in full PPE for the technician.

What can somebody tell us about this?